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Articles found: 29 of 164

Editorial Editorial eucrim 2/2020

10 September 2020 // english

The special coronavirus recovery fund of the EU is to provide €750 billion for the years 2021 – 2023. In addition, the new EU multi-annual financial framework will amount to €1074 billion, including significant amounts earmarked for corona aid and other subsidies. Considering additionally that national and regional budgets also provide for similar aid, there will ultimately be an unprecedented increase in subsidies and thus a huge potential booty for criminals. A considerable number of corona subsidy fraud cases have already shown up in the Member States, including fake websites and phishing mails seeking to redirect corona aid to criminals’… Read more

Editorial Guest Editorial eucrim 1/2020

3 July 2020 (updated 2 months, 3 weeks ago) // english

Dear Readers, Several anniversaries were recently celebrated in relation to the EU, in general, and to the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice (ASFJ), in particular: 60 years since the signature of the Treaty of Rome, 20 years since the enactment of the principle of mutual recognition, 10 years since the entry into force of the Treaty of Lisbon. The dynamic European landscape is giving rise to an increasing number of actors and instruments in judicial cooperation in criminal matters, with undeniable repercussions for the Member States. This can be seen not only from a legal/judicial perspective but also from… Read more

Editorial Guest Editorial eucrim 4/2019

18 February 2020 (updated 7 months ago) // english

Dear Readers, 20 years ago, the European Council gave Justice and Home Affairs policy an unprecedented boost by setting out an ambitious agenda to simplify judicial cooperation and to enhance criminal justice across the Union. The Tampere Programme has led to many successful initiatives. I intend to continue this work. In her Mission letter the President von der Leyen has assigned me an immensely stimulating task: “to focus on the pursuit of social justice in its broadest sense, from the rule of law to crime prevention, judicial cooperation and consumer protection.” I want first to ensure that new ground-breaking legal… Read more

Editorial Guest Editorial eucrim 3/2019

17 December 2019 (updated 8 months ago) // english

Dear Readers, Cross-border cooperation between prosecuting authorities in Europe can still be a challenging effort in 2019. Within the EU, in spite of the many improved tools available to prosecutors, such as the European Investigation Order, cooperation is still very much a matter of the willingness and readiness of the requested country to cooperate and of the allocation of resources. In fact, the EU’s legal framework in this field is still based on the decision of the requested (judicial or prosecuting) authority to execute the requested activity, even when fundamental rights are not at stake. The basics of the legal… Read more

Editorial Guest Editorial eucrim 2/2019

14 August 2019 (updated 1 year ago) // english

Dear Readers, Developing criminal law and judicial cooperation in criminal matters has been a key component of Union policies for the last 20 years. The Union’s common area of freedom, security and justice (AFSJ) provides citizens and companies with both security and rights, in particular by ensuring an ever-increasing coordination between judicial authorities, the progressive mutual recognition of judgments and judicial decisions in criminal matters, and the necessary approximation of criminal laws. Soon, Union institutions must take stock of what has been achieved and what remains to be done. Our future priorities must follow the wake of our achievements but... Read more

Editorial Guest Editorial eucrim 1/2019

7 June 2019 (updated 1 year, 3 months ago) // english

Twenty years have passed since the EU heads of state and government came together in Tampere and agreed that the principle of mutual recognition should become the cornerstone of judicial cooperation in criminal matters between the EU Member States. This was followed by the adoption of an ambitious list of mutual recognition instruments for the pre-trial, trial, and post-trial phases, which all reflect the same basic notions: direct contact between judicial authorities, uniform templates, short deadlines, a duty to recognise and execute (subject to limited grounds for refusal), and a presumption of mutual trust.

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